Doing the work of angels

Published: November 3, 2006 | 5000th good news item since 2003

Every month in the Tri-City area, hundreds of families are benefiting from Angel Food Ministries – a program which is designed to give people a helping hand, not a handout.

Through the efforts of Woodland Hills Baptist Church in Newcastle, and starting next week, Tuttle First Assembly of God, families can purchase a box of high-quality food for a fraction of the cost through the program.

Angel Food got its start in 1994, at Emmanuel Praise Church in Monroe, Ga. Pastors Joe and Linda Wingo started the program by feeding 34 families, handing out the food from their back porch.

Angel Food now has hundreds of locations in more than 30 states, with more than 400,000 boxes being distributed in one month.

Woodland Hills are celebrating their one-year anniversary with Angel Food, led by Kim Martin and Stephanie Phillips, this month. It was in 2005 that Martin, along with her parents, Paul and Mary Williams, and other friends and family, were ordering Angel Food boxes from a church in Oklahoma City.

According to Mary Williams, at one point, they were picking up 17 boxes at once, and seeing other people from the community there as well.

“We just felt like there was a need, so we enquired about starting our own program,” said Williams, who volunteers every month with Woodland Hill’s Angel Food. “We found out that for every 50 that we sell, we get one free that we can give away to a needy family in the community. This is what really peaked our interest. We have a lot of needy families in this area.”

Participants picked up food at Woodland Hills on Saturday, Oct. 21. Ten days later, the cycle begins again.

The Assembly of God church will be holding their very first ordering day on Tuesday, Oct. 31, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., which will be followed by Thursday, Nov. 2 and Saturday, Nov. 4 ordering opportunities. Woodland Hills will take orders on Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Brandi Hernandez and Kimberley Owen are spearheading the effort at the Assembly of God, and they both said they were planning to copy Woodland Hills’ streamlined program. At the Newcastle church, several volunteers are set up at a long table to take orders, armed with calculators. Angel Food customers come by during the specified times and pay for their orders, which will come in after two weeks. Personal checks are not accepted, but cash and food stamp cards are.

A box full of food costs $25, and add-on specials of items like steak or chicken tenders are also available at a reduced cost. A first-time customer must also put down a $4 deposit for a plastic tub, which the food is delivered in. Customers who have previously ordered Angel Food bring back their plastic tub when they order, waiving the $4 deposit. There is no limit to the boxes of food ordered, and many families order four or more boxes a month.

When a customer pays for their food, they are given a receipt with the pick up date and time. Woodland Hills staggers their pick up times so customers don’t have to face a long wait on pick up day.

Menus are available at the secretary’s office at the Assembly of God. Woodland Hills posts the menu, plus additional information, on their website at www.whbcok.org.

Orders are sent to Angel Food Ministries headquarters in Monroe, Ga., and the food is delivered to the local area on refrigerated trucks. Most months, the truck delivers food directly to Woodland Hills and other area churches pick up their orders there before distribution.

Volunteers at Woodland Hills start unloading the truck around 5:30 a.m. on distribution day. The 50 to 60 volunteers man different stations at the church. Some are runners, delivering receipts to the front desk. Others load food into the plastic tubs. A volunteer might stand for hours, placing a sack of potatoes into each plastic tub scooted along past them. Others load the tubs into the back of pickups or into car trunks. Everyone is an important part of the process.

Most customers have no idea what’s going on inside when they pick up their food. They enter the church parking lot from the south entrance and drive around the church building to the first entrance. There, a volunteer takes their receipt and runs it in the building, where another table of volunteers sit. Each has a list of customer names. Those names are checked off as their receipts are brought in. The customer drives forward to the second entrance, where one or more tubs full of food, plus add-on boxes, are delivered right to their vehicle. In most cases, the customer has no wait and doesn’t even have to get out of their car.

Customers also get a flier with the next month’s menu on it, plus the official Angel Food Ministries magazine, “The Servant.” Woodland Hills also hands out a booklet of menu suggestions and recipes, compiled by the McClain County OSU Extension office. Recipe ideas include Easy Italian Meatballs and Pasta or Tangy Chicken Cordon Bleu. Most items required for the recipe come straight from the Angel Food box.

Volunteers stress that this program is for everyone, not just “needy people.”

“This is not a program for low income families. This is not a program just for people on Social Security,” said Mary Williams. “This is a program for anybody who wants to participate and get really, really good food at a really, really good price, and cut down on the grocery shopping bills. In this day and age, I think everybody needs to save all the money they can.”

At the Assembly of God Church, Brandi Hernandez said that Angel Food was a good way to save money without compromising quality for the family.

“The quality of the food is unbelievable, really,” she said. “If anybody has ever gotten any kind of commodities or food from a food pantry, this is almost uncomparable. It’s such a blessing.”Every month in the Tri-City area, hundreds of families are benefiting from Angel Food Ministries – a program which is designed to give people a helping hand, not a handout.

Through the efforts of Woodland Hills Baptist Church in Newcastle, and starting next week, Tuttle First Assembly of God, families can purchase a box of high-quality food for a fraction of the cost through the program.

Angel Food got its start in 1994, at Emmanuel Praise Church in Monroe, Ga. Pastors Joe and Linda Wingo started the program by feeding 34 families, handing out the food from their back porch.

Angel Food now has hundreds of locations in more than 30 states, with more than 400,000 boxes being distributed in one month.

Woodland Hills are celebrating their one-year anniversary with Angel Food, led by Kim Martin and Stephanie Phillips, this month. It was in 2005 that Martin, along with her parents, Paul and Mary Williams, and other friends and family, were ordering Angel Food boxes from a church in Oklahoma City.

According to Mary Williams, at one point, they were picking up 17 boxes at once, and seeing other people from the community there as well.

“We just felt like there was a need, so we enquired about starting our own program,” said Williams, who volunteers every month with Woodland Hill’s Angel Food. “We found out that for every 50 that we sell, we get one free that we can give away to a needy family in the community. This is what really peaked our interest. We have a lot of needy families in this area.”

Participants picked up food at Woodland Hills on Saturday, Oct. 21. Ten days later, the cycle begins again.

The Assembly of God church will be holding their very first ordering day on Tuesday, Oct. 31, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., which will be followed by Thursday, Nov. 2 and Saturday, Nov. 4 ordering opportunities. Woodland Hills will take orders on Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday.

Brandi Hernandez and Kimberley Owen are spearheading the effort at the Assembly of God, and they both said they were planning to copy Woodland Hills’ streamlined program. At the Newcastle church, several volunteers are set up at a long table to take orders, armed with calculators. Angel Food customers come by during the specified times and pay for their orders, which will come in after two weeks. Personal checks are not accepted, but cash and food stamp cards are.

A box full of food costs $25, and add-on specials of items like steak or chicken tenders are also available at a reduced cost. A first-time customer must also put down a $4 deposit for a plastic tub, which the food is delivered in. Customers who have previously ordered Angel Food bring back their plastic tub when they order, waiving the $4 deposit. There is no limit to the boxes of food ordered, and many families order four or more boxes a month.

When a customer pays for their food, they are given a receipt with the pick up date and time. Woodland Hills staggers their pick up times so customers don’t have to face a long wait on pick up day.

Menus are available at the secretary’s office at the Assembly of God. Woodland Hills posts the menu, plus additional information, on their website at www.whbcok.org.

Orders are sent to Angel Food Ministries headquarters in Monroe, Ga., and the food is delivered to the local area on refrigerated trucks. Most months, the truck delivers food directly to Woodland Hills and other area churches pick up their orders there before distribution.

Volunteers at Woodland Hills start unloading the truck around 5:30 a.m. on distribution day. The 50 to 60 volunteers man different stations at the church. Some are runners, delivering receipts to the front desk. Others load food into the plastic tubs. A volunteer might stand for hours, placing a sack of potatoes into each plastic tub scooted along past them. Others load the tubs into the back of pickups or into car trunks. Everyone is an important part of the process.

Most customers have no idea what’s going on inside when they pick up their food. They enter the church parking lot from the south entrance and drive around the church building to the first entrance. There, a volunteer takes their receipt and runs it in the building, where another table of volunteers sit. Each has a list of customer names. Those names are checked off as their receipts are brought in. The customer drives forward to the second entrance, where one or more tubs full of food, plus add-on boxes, are delivered right to their vehicle. In most cases, the customer has no wait and doesn’t even have to get out of their car.

Customers also get a flier with the next month’s menu on it, plus the official Angel Food Ministries magazine, “The Servant.” Woodland Hills also hands out a booklet of menu suggestions and recipes, compiled by the McClain County OSU Extension office. Recipe ideas include Easy Italian Meatballs and Pasta or Tangy Chicken Cordon Bleu. Most items required for the recipe come straight from the Angel Food box.

Volunteers stress that this program is for everyone, not just “needy people.”

“This is not a program for low income families. This is not a program just for people on Social Security,” said Mary Williams. “This is a program for anybody who wants to participate and get really, really good food at a really, really good price, and cut down on the grocery shopping bills. In this day and age, I think everybody needs to save all the money they can.”

At the Assembly of God Church, Brandi Hernandez said that Angel Food was a good way to save money without compromising quality for the family.

“The quality of the food is unbelievable, really,” she said. “If anybody has ever gotten any kind of commodities or food from a food pantry, this is almost uncomparable. It’s such a blessing.”

Published in Angel Food Ministries, Charity, Community, Faith
See also: www.tuttletimes.com
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